Speakers & Abstracts


Fumihito Arai

Fumihito Arai

Professor
Department of Micro-Nano Systems Engineering, Nagoya University
CV

Title: Innovation of Micro and Nano Robotic Technologies for Measurement and Separation of Single Cell

Abstract: Robot is one of the promising tools for the treatment of biological cell instead of human handling, due to its non-skill dependent, high throughput, and repeatable properties. Integration of the microfluidic chip and robotics based on micro and nanotechnology is key issue for biomedical innovations. In addition to the advantage of environmental control by microfluidic chip, robot enables physical operation to the cell with high throughput. In order to obtain advantages of both of microfluidic device and micromechanical manipulator, we have proposed micro and nano robot on a microfluidic chip "On-chip robot" since 1999. The on-chip robot has great potential to achieve accurate cell measurement and manipulation for broad range of biological applications with high throughput by taking advantage of flow control of microfluidic chip. In additions, the cost of the on-chip robot is generally low owing to the small size of the probe and microfluidic chip, and thus some parts are disposable after the operation. Furthermore, closed or partially opened design of microfluidic chip also helps to prevent cell contamination as well as to provide stable and secure environment for the robot actuations. In this talk, recent progress on high power, high precision, and high speed micro and nano robotic technologies are introduced for single-cell manipulation, measurement of mechanical properties of cell, and separation of rare cells. Design and fabrication of innovative system is also discussed.


Kazushi Asami

Kazushi Asami

Manager, DENSO Corporation
CV

Title: Future prospect of car electronics and expectation to 3D LSI for Smart Mobility

Abstract: In recent years the autonomous driving technology including the Google Self-Driving Car accomplishes remarkable progress. Numerous Japanese car manufacturers accelerate the development for it for the holding of the Tokyo Olympics 2020.
This presentation introduces the development trend for the autonomous driving and the expectation to the necessary technologies.


Kana Asano

Kana Asano

Chief, Department of Strategic Planning and Management, Office of Innovation Planning and Promotion
Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST)
CV

Title: Global Activities of JST toward Promotion of R&D on Nanotechnology and Materials Science

Abstract: Generally speaking, international collaborative research requires more efforts, costs, and time. However, the number of publication of internationally co-authored scientific papers has significantly increased in these days. This indicates that researchers conduct international collaborative research more than before. Why researchers are getting active in international collaboration? One of the reasons may the complexity and advancement of current cutting-edge R&D activities. As a result, single research institution or single research laboratory cannot complete all required resources such as knowledge, human resources, funds, technology, and facility, by itself. In the meanwhile, globalization is significantly accelerated and now we can communicate and travel easily across borders. Therefore, researchers can find their most appropriate collaborative partners from all over the world to maximize their R&D outcomes. Today, the international collaboration is critically important for cutting-edge R&D.
Under these circumstances, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) supports international collaborative research through joint call for proposals based on cooperation with funding agencies around the world. In addition, JST promotes globalization of strategic basic research programs (CREST/PRESTO). This talk will introduce such activities of JST focusing on nanotechnology and materials science research.


Rolf Aschenbrenner

Rolf Aschenbrenner

Deputy Director, Dept. SIIT K.-D. Lang, Director
Fraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration
CV

Title: Hetero-integration for Cyber Physical Systems at Wafer-level and Panel-level

Abstract: The networking of machines, products and almost any object will lead to new applications and rapidly transform the world as we know it. Cyber-physical systems (CPS) form the interface between intelligent products, machines, objects, persons and the virtual world and thus compose the precondition for the Internet of Things. System integration technologies will play a key role for the realization of cyber-physical systems. The paper describes the components of CPS as well as advanced assembly and packaging technologies used for the integration of systems into their application environments.
At first, basic correlations between cyber-physical systems, the Internet of Things, Big Data and new fields of application are shown, jointly with the derivation of important requirements. As a next step, sensors and their wireless networks, as well as the required antennas, are exhibited. For example the transmission of large data volumes along short distances will become more relevant and lead to the provision of high-capacity antennas. Wafer-level and panel-level packaging technologies form an excellent platform for the buildup of cyber-physical systems. In this context, a selection of technological processes are described which could be used for the realization of miniaturized and highly reliable components of CPS. Finally, a number of application cases are shown, illustrating the usage of system integration technologies for the buildup of cyber-physical systems which at the same time exemplify the manifold application fields of CPS.


Dirk Beernaert

Dirk Beernaert

Adviser for Cross-Cutting Innovation
DG CNECT, European Commission
CV

Title: An European industrial policy for Digital and Key Enabling Technologies with emphasis on nanoelectronics and related applications.

Abstract: The year 2014 was bringing to Europe a new Commisssion. The J-C Juncker Commission, while promoting shared European social values and a resilient energy and foreward looking climate change policy, has put the highest priority on jobs, growth and investments and on a strengthened industrial base in a connected digital single market. Digital technologies, the digitalisation of products and processes, Key Enabling Ttechnologies (KETs) and nanoelectronics and electronic systems in particular are directly contributing to this European "industrial renaisance". Also the 7 year 77 B€ Horizon 2020 Programme which guides the R&D&I activities at European level and combines education, research and innovation in one single programme, will contribute to this objective and has to make Europe a stronger global actor.
The presentation will elaborate on the industrial strategy for KETs and electronics and will put the related activities in Horizon 2020 in a larger industry policy context. Furthermore it will elaborate on a roadmap for electronic components and systems and address future planned activities in this field.


Toyohiro Chikyow

Toyohiro Chikyow

Principle Investogator, MANA Nanoelectronics Unit, NIMS
CV

Title: Overview of INC11 and Japan Nano Day

Abstract: It has passed more than 10 years since we started the International Nanotechnology Conference for communication and cooperation (INC) collaborated with US EU and Japan. This conference has provide topics about advance innovation in computer, communications, electronics, chemistry, opto/display electronics, biology and related industries realized by fusion of nano electronics and nanotechnology. Still now electronics is a major fundamental in industry and the applied fields are expanding. At the same time, due to the scaling limit in LSIs, we need new device, new architecture and new materials to overcome this limit. Therefore it is essential to share knowledge and trend to overlook the coming 10 years.
In the sessions on Japan Nano Day, we invite researchers who manage national project for the future, including nano electronics, new memory device, 3D integration and critical materials. Also cutting edge measurements are shown on the day.
This time as a special topics, we invite attractive talks on "Smart mobility". This field is related to a various electronics and nano materials. You can see the practical fusion of nano electronics and nano technology there.
I hope you enjoy this conference and expect this INC11 provides hints for future research and collaboration between US, EU and Japan.


Kos Galatsis

Kos Galatsis

Associate Professor
Material Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)
CV

Title: Report from IPWGN

Abstract: This presetnation will highlight the work product of the International Planning Working Group on Nanoelectronics (IPWGN) that aims to synthesize nanoelectronics research program data from Europe, Japan and the United States, and report on funding gaps and opportunities. The data aims to decipher the research areas of strength and weakness, in order to better align today's research expenditures with tomorrow's nanoelectronics/semiconductor and market requirements.


Paolo Gargini

Paolo Gargini

ITRS
CV

Title: US Industry's Nanoelectronics Initiatives and Results

Abstract: The ITRS with participation from Europe, Japan, Korea, Taiwan and the US outlined the way towards a fundamental restructuring of semiconductor devices in 1998. The ITRS predicted that Equivalent Scaling (ES) methodology was going to start replacing Geometrical Scaling (GS) in CMOS transistors within 5 years. The Focus Center Research Program (FCRP) was initiated in this timeframe to support this research. By 2003 the first technology of ES (strained silicon) was introduced into manufacturing. The National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) was launched in the year 2000 in the United States under Dr. Mike Roco leadership. Shortly after Japan and Europe introduced similar initiatives. SIA launched the Nanoelectronics Research Initiative (NRI) in 2005 aimed at selecting the most likely post-CMOS candidates to be introduced into manufacturing beyond the year 2020 as a follow up to Equivalent Scaling. Both NSF and NIST became active members of NRI. Europe and Japan organizations were invited to participate in INC conferences. In 2012 NRI and FCRP programs were restructured and the latter was renamed Semiconductor Technology Advanced Research Network (STARnet). In addition other organizations like the Center for Energy Efficient Electronics Science (E3S) have augmented the research in post-CMOS devices.
In the latter part of the previous decade the pervasive penetration of the Internet and the introduction of smart phones marked the beginning of a complete change in the structures and methods of the electronics and semiconductor industries.
Nowadays smart mobile devices capable of wirelessly and ubiquitously accessing information everywhere in the world have reached the most remote parts of the world. Fabless companies generating IC designs that are manufactured by Foundries have revolutionized the way the semiconductor industry operates. The ITRS was completely restructured in 2014 to address the needs of this new ecosystem. In addition, the computer industry realized that a major change was in order and created the Rebooting Computing (RC) initiative to revamp computer architectures. ITRS and RC have initiated joint activities this year aimed at introducing new computer architectures utilizing new devices beyond the year 2020. Highlights of all these activities will be presented.


Rob Hartman

R.A. Hartman

Director Strategic Technology, ASML
CV

Title: Europe - Industry


Kazuhiro Hono

Kazuhiro Hono

National Institute for Materials Science Tsukuba
CV

Title: Dy-free high coercivity Nd-Fe-B based permanent magnets for automotive applications

Abstract: Nd-Fe-B sintered magnets invented by Masato Sagawa in 1982 is the strongest permanent magnet even today. The Nd-Fe-B based magnets are widely used in many critical components like motors, generators, wind turbines, cell phones and hard disks. Among these, the usage of high coercivity (Nd,Dy)-Fe-B based permanent magnets is rapidly increasing due to the expansion of the applications where the operating temperature increases like the traction motors of hybrid and electric vehicles. The recent concern of the scarce supply of Dy has stimulated worldwide research on the development of Dy-free high coercivity Nd-Fe-B magnets. At the same time, many scientists have even started exploring rare earth free magnets. In this talk, we will discuss the intrinsic properties required as permanent magnet compounds and explain why only Nd-Fe-B based permanent magnets are industrially viable as high performance magnets from the engineering point of view. We will also benchmark the materials cost and the expected performance of recently proposed rare earth free magnets and critically assess the feasibility of them for industrial viability. Then we will give an overview on our recent efforts towards the development of high coercivity Dy-free Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets as a realistic solution for next generation permanent magnets. To the end, we will discuss the possibility of finding a new magnetic compound for high performance magnets with a lower amount of rare earth elements.


Diana Huffaker

Diana Huffaker

Professor, California Nano-Systems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles
CV

Title: Patterned III-V Nanopillars: A platform for integrated optoelectronic devices

Abstract: Realizing the integration of nanostructures into useful devices and photonic systems has been a topic in hot pursuit for almost a decade. While many groups demonstrate innovative synthesis techniques and compelling device possibilities, true utility has not yet been realized. Furthermore, the utility of nanoscale physics has not been exploited. In this work, we focus on photolithographically defined nanopillars: the diameter, pitch and mask arrangement can be precisely pre-determined at nanometric resolution. Our approach, which is more compared to catalyzed synthesis, allows exquisite control of material composition and doping thus enabling the possibility of competitive device realization. This presentation includes discussion of nanoscale epitaxy, heterostructure formation, surface state effects and doping issues. Device demonstrations include recordholding hybrid photovoltaics, room-temperature, continuous-wave photonic crystal lasers and plasmonic-enhanced avalanche photodetectors (APD) featuring self-aligned subwavelength metal grating. The APD performance is characterized by nanoscale dimensions to demonstrate THz frequency response with very low noise. Quantum-dot synthesis and device applications will also be discussed along with 2D materials studies to develop silicene epitaxy.


Hidemi Ishiuchi

Hidemi Ishiuchi

Senior Manager, Research & Development Strategic Office, Research & Development Division
Toshiba Corporation
CV

Title: Nanoelectronics in Japan Industry

Abstract: During 90 years after the publication of Werner Heisenberg's matrix mechanics, quantum mechanics has been providing the theoretical basis for the progress of semiconductor devices. Fifty years have passed form the publication of Moore's law, which have been providing the guideline for the expansion of semiconductor industry. On the other hand, the scaling, which have been one of the major technological measures for the device improvement during these 40 years, is now approaching its dead end. Scaling, thus, has no longer meant the simple geometrical down-sizing, but is now including "equivalent scaling" and "design equivalent scaling." Diversification and multi-function directed More than Moore, and Beyond CMOS as well, should be taken into account for the progress of semiconductor devices. We have been exploring the interdisciplinary collaborations among technology fields, among material, device and system layers and among the US-EU-Japan regions in 10 years of INC meetings, such collaboration has become essential for the future progress of the semiconductor industry and the progress of future society.
In this talk, some examples of such "heterogeneous integration" would be discussed as device mechanism (ex. electron-spin), device- architecture and application (ex. device-life science). Recent results of Japanese nanoelectronics projects and companies will be also reported.


Charlie Johnson

A.T. Charlie Johnson, Ph.D.

Professor, Physics and Astronomy University of Pennsylvania
CV

Title: Graphene-enabled Nano/Bio Hybrids for Chemical Detection and Medical Diagnostics

Abstract: We have explored all-electronic chemical detectors based on bio-nano hybrids, where the biomolecule (DNA or protein) provides chemical recognition and a carbon nanotube (NT), graphene, or monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) transistor enables electronic readout. Building on rapid advances in nanomaterials research and biomolecular engineering, this sensor class represents a promising approach towards sensitive and selective detection of liquid- and vapor-phase anayltes. Coupling chemistries have been developed that allow for creation of nanoelectronic and/or nanophotonic interfaces to a variety of different proteins including wild types and variants engineered for use in nanotechnology. Such bio-nano hybrids enable detection of protein cancer biomarkers, antigen from various pathogens, and small molecule targets at concentrations ~ 1 pg/mL. Single stranded DNA can be coupled to nanotubes and graphene through non-covalent functionalization and then used for its chemical recognition for small molecule analytes rather than recognition of complementary DNA. Vapor sensors based on this approach are able to discriminate between highly similar compounds such as enantiomers and very similar complex vapor mixtures characteristic of humans. More recently we have shown the promise of this system for diagnosis of disease based on volatile biomarkers. The chemical responses of this sensor class vary with the based sequence of the DNA, making this a promising pathway towards a system for machine olfaction. The work was supported by the National Science Foundation, Lockheed Martin, the Air Force Research Laboratory, Intel, and DARPA.


Toshihiko Kanayama

Toshihiko Kanayama

Senior Vice-President
AIST
CV

Title: Research Activities of TIA-NANO

Abstract: Cross-disciplinary integration is an essential requirement to develop achievements of nanotechnology into actual industrial innovations. To meet this requirement, the Tsukuba Innovation Arena for nanotechnology (TIA-nano) was organized in 2009 by the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), and the University of Tsukuba with the support of KEIDANREN (Japan Business Federation). Lately, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) joined in this framework in 2012. The purpose of TIA-nano is to integrate research capabilities accumulated in the above four organizations in Tsukuba to provide a hub platform, where intense collaborations are solicited between various sectors of industries and academia aiming at innovations and human resource development. At the moment, more than 1000 researchers and engineers are gathering from roughly 200 companies to be engaged in R&D projects conducted in the TIA-nano.
On the basis of expertise accumulated in the four constituting organizations, the TIA is focusing on the following six core research domains, most of which are aiming at the Green Innovation: Nanoelectronics, Power Electronics, NanoMEMS, Carbon Nanotubes, Nano-Green, and Nano-Material Safety. Nanoelectronics has developed the following devices capable of extremely low power operations; e.g., high-mobility channel transistors and steep-slope transistors for low-voltage logic, non-volatile memories, and Si-photonics devices for low-power optical interconnect and network. Mass production technologies of single-walled carbon nanotubes and SiC power transitors have been developed, and are now being transferred to actual production.


Leonidas Karapiperis

Leonidas Karapiperis

Minister Counsellor
Head of Science and Technology Section, Delegation of the European Union to Japan
CV

Title: EU's Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme, Open to the World - Focus on nonotechnology

Abstract: "Horizon 2020" is the European Union's main instrument for funding research and innovation activities over the seven-year period 2014 to 2020. It focuses on three overarching priorities - excellent science, industrial leadership and societal challenges, and disposes of a budget close to EUR 80 billion. It is at the heart of EU's strategy for sustainable, inclusive and smart growth. Recognizing the increasing internationalisation in how knowledge is produced and used as well as the global nature of the many societal challenges requiring research and innovation solutions, Horizon 2020 is open to researcher participation anywhere in the world.
The first part of the presentation will cover the main elements of Horizon 2020, with special emphasis on the types of international cooperation it can accommodate. The second part will address activities related to various aspects of nanoelectronics and nanotechnology at large, where the EU has put forward a strategy with the ultimate goals of providing a strong supply base, accelerate the demand and prepare a solid infrastructure for future growth. On the supply side, the presentation will highlight two major applications: the future automated and connected car and the opportunities offered by the demographic ageing (the 'silver economy'). Some of the technological challenges therein can be better addressed through cooperation at international level, as exemplified by the one existing between the EU and Japan in the area of network technologies, and which will be extended to ICT-based solutions for "Healthy Ageing".
This strategy is complemented by a Smart Systems Integration programme, aiming at the development of solutions that make use of a variety of disciplines (biology, mechanics, chemistry, magnetism,..) integrated at the nanoscale.
In parallel, particular importance is given to all aspects of nanosafety, where international cooperation is essential.


Tsuneo Komatsuzaki

Tsuneo Komatsuzaki

Managing Executive Officer, Director of Intelligent Systems Laboratory
SECOM CO., LTD
CV

Title: The Secret of Service Innovation

Abstract: Since our founding in 1962 as the first private security firm in Japan, SECOM has strived to create a secure, convienient and comfortable society through services in seven diverse business domains, physical security, fire protection, medical services, insurance, geographical information, information technology and communications, and housing development. On SECOM's 50th anniversary in 2012, we announced a strategic focus on three major domains for the future-"Security," "Disaster prevention and mitigation" and the "Super-aging Society," and are currently implementing service innovation in these key domains.
To sustain affluent society in the future, a multitude of social resources must work together extremely efficiently and seamlessly. Above all, since humans are located at the center of all social activities, it is vital that each person's output be amplified to the extent possible. In the security domain, we have achieved nearly an 1000-fold increase in output through service innovation by fusing human and machine technologies into our proprietary online security system. This success is not due to advances in technology, but by gazing at our customers and society while creating new energy to fuel service innovations by combining our strong desire to improve society while utilizing cutting-edge technologies as vital tools.
Nanotechnology is highly anticipated to bring new technological innovations to society. Early detection of abnormalities, accurate situational awareness and fast response---these processes are essential to all SECOM services. Through nanotechnology, new materials, extreme device miniturization and power savings will accelerate innovations in our service processes.
Nanotechnology will further evolve once society intuitively understands its true value. Thus an important point to those involved in research and development as well as the governmental and private institutions which are integrating nanotechnology into products and services: Visions and passions must be shared, connected and fused. As such an institution, SECOM will seek to integrate these new nanotechnologies to create ever more innovative services so that society can "intuitively value nanotechnology," and commit ourselves to continued service innovation.


Mitsumasa Koyanagi

Mitsumasa Koyanagi

New Industry Creation Hatchery Center (NICHe), Tohoku University
CV

Title: 3D LSI and Nanotechnology for IoTs

Abstract: Various concerns such as higher off-state and sub-threshold leakages, VT variability, and large signal delay by wiring etc. have emerged in high-density and high-performance LSIs as MOSFET is scaling down toward 10nm or less. To overcome these concerns, it is indispensable to introduce a concept of heterogeneous integration based on nanotechnology in which various kinds of materials, devices and technologies are integrated onto a Si substrate. Such a heterogeneous integration is easily realized by three-dimensional (3D) integration which enables 3D heterogeneous stacking of different kinds of chips such as compound semiconductor device chip, photonic device chip and spintronic device chip on CMOS chips. Such new heterogeneous 3D integration based on nanotechnology is indispensable for future Internet of Things (IoT). IoT is expected to offer advanced connectivity of devices, systems, and services including machine-to-machine communications (M2M) and human-to-machine communications (H2M). Low power consumption, small form factor and multi-functionality are required for embedded devices in IoT. Heterogeneous 3D integration based on nanotechnology can provide these embedded devices with low power consumption, small form factor and multifunctionality. We call such heterogeneous 3D LSI a super-chip. To fabricate a super-chip, we have developed a new heterogeneous 3D integration technology using a self-assembly self-assembly and electrostatic bonding technique where a number of dies are simultaneously bonded to a carrier wafer by the electrostatic force after precisely aligned them with high alignment accuracy utilizing the surface tension of liquid. Such new heterogeneous 3D integration technology for IoT is described.


Yoshimi Kubo

Yoshimi Kubo

Senior Scientist with Special Missions Team Leader, Lithium Air Battery Specially Promoted Research Team, GREEN, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS)
CV

Title: Cell stack of lithium-air rechargeable batteries

Abstract: Nonaqueous lithium-air (O2) rechargeable batteries have attracted much attention because of its huge theoretical energy density, which exceeds 1000 Wh/kg. Ether-based electrolytes have been proved to be rather stable for the oxygen reduction reaction at the cathode of lithium-air batteries, showing substantially improved cyclability without apparent side reactions. However, to realize such high energy density in practical applications, a large number of lithium-air cells must be stacked, similar to the configuration of conventional lithium-ion batteries. This configuration requires a novel design of the cell stack such that air can be supplied to the cathode. We have recently developed an "air-breathing" passive system for lithium-air batteries comprising multicell stacks, where air is breathed in and out through porous current collectors sandwiched between cathodes. A ten-cell stack was assembled and subjected to more than ten discharge-charge cycles.


Hubert Lakner

Hubert Lakner

Fraunhofer

Title:


Gereon Meyer

Gereon Meyer

Head of Strategic Projects, Dept. Future Technologies and Europe VDI/VDE Innovation + Technik GmbH
CV

Title: European Roadmap on Smart Systems for Automated Driving

Abstract: Smart micro and nano electronic components and their systems integration are key enabling technologies for innovative products and applications. This is most obvious in the automotive sector where smart systems are integral building blocks for advanced driver assistance and automated functions. Driver assistance systems enable breakthroughs in road and passenger safety, energy efficiency and emission reduction. Higher degrees of road vehicle automation appear to be feasible soon [1]. Automated driving will, on the long term, contribute to the reduction of road fatalities, increase productivity and social inclusion, and add value in terms of energy efficiency and the protection of the environment. European vehicle manufacturers, automotive suppliers and electronics industry have been successful in developing and implementing advanced driver assistance systems in the past. The European Technology Platform on Smart Systems Integration (EPoSS) recently presented a roadmap on automated driving which describes the technology paths for higher degrees of automated driving (SAE levels 3 and above) by defining milestones and indicating timeframes for development of key technologies related to smart systems integration [2]. This exercise shall allow private and public stakeholders to determine what actions in research and innovation have to be taken when and for what reason.
References:
[1] Gereon Meyer, Sven Beiker (Eds.), Road Vehicle Automation. Springer, Cham 2014.
[2] European Roadmap Smart Systems for Automated Driving. EPoSS, Berlin 2015.


Subhasish Mitra

Subhasish Mitra

Stanford University
CV

Title: From Nanodevices to Nanosystems: Carbon Nanotube N3XT Information Technology Revolution

Abstract: Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors (CNFETs) can revolutionize the design of highly energy-efficient future electronic systems. Unfortunately, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) face major obstacles such as substantial imperfections and variations inherent to CNTs, and low CNFET current densities.
A combination of CNFET circuit design and CNT processing techniques (the "imperfection-immune paradigm") overcomes these challenges to enable the experimental demonstration of the carbon nanotube computer, and, more generally, arbitrary CNFET digital systems. These are the first system-level demonstrations among promising emerging nanotechnologies for high-performance and highly energy-efficient digital systems.
We will also discuss new nanosystem architectures enabled by monolithic three-dimensional (3D) integration of CNFETs and emerging memories. Such fine-grained 3D integration allows for computation immersed in memory, and is key to achieving very high degrees of energy efficiency for emerging abundant-data applications.
This research was performed at Stanford University in collaboration with Prof. H.-S. Philip Wong and several graduate students.


Reiko Miyata

Reiko Miyata

Professor
NagoyaUniv. Office of Industry Liaison, ImPACT Program Manager
CV

Title: ImPACT2: Ultra high-speed multiplexed sensing system beyond evolution for detection of extremely small amounts of substances

Abstract: In the challenges for my Impact program, using ultrafine electronics that exceed the exceptional biological capabilities of insects, achieve a simple and effective method for protecting ourselves from the harmful and hazardous substances around us so that everybody can achieve a healthy and comfortable lifestyle.


Naofumi Moriya

Naofumi Moriya

Director for Nanotechnology and Materials, Bureau of Science, Technology and Innovation, Cabinet Office
CV

Title: The Leading Program for Science, Technology and Innovation

Abstract: From Fiscal Year of 2014, two new national innitiatives, "Cross-ministerial Strategic Innovation Promotion Program" and "Impulsing Paradigm Change through Disruptive Technologies (ImPACT) Program", have been introduced to lead the innovation through science and technology. The presentation will show the outline of these innitiatives focusing on the objectives and the activities of programs which are specifically related to nanotechnologies and materials.


CV

Title: Regional Update on Science and Technology Programs in Japan

Abstract: The government of Japan is strongly promoting the national policy on science, technology and innovation (STI). In this presentation, updated status of the investment of R&D and the national policy on STI will be introduced. From FY2014, the government of Japan has introduced two new STI programs: "Cross-ministerial Strategic Innovation Promotion Program(SIP)" and "Impulsing Paradigm Change through Disruptive Technologies (ImPACT) Program", to induce the innovation in Japanese society. A couple of nanotechnology and material related projects of SIP will be featured in the presentation. The further expansion of TIA-nano platform capability will be briefly explained as well.


Yuko Nagano

Yuko Nagano

Director, Materials, Science and Nanotechnology Development Division,
Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT)
CV

Title: Research strategy and program for nanotechnologies

Abstract: Nanotechnology is the cornerstone to support the key industries for many countries including Japan. It is also the basement to support various research fields as well as the essential basic technologies to solve the broaden areas of social problems such as resources and energies.
MEXT supports and puts in place a research infrastructure in Japan in order to remain making a strong showing in nanotechnology and material science.
The Committee of Nanotechnology and material science in MEXT points out the basic policies of the research and development in the field of nanotechnology and materials science as follows.
1) MEXT may promote materials research based on the new guidance principle for breaking ground the front of broaden research area by nanotechnology. Effective measure would be to be prepared the environment which never misses the sign of serendipity and to support the high-risk research.
2) It is expected to develop new application and solve the problems recently appeared and the long-standing problems providing innovative approach by nanotechnology.
3) It is important to promote the "switching back and forth" research that the science questions in each phase feedback to basic research but not linear modeling style research from basic to application.
The outline of major programs which are promoted by MEXT will be introduced panoramically based on those basic policies mentioned above.


Sebastien Patoux

Sebastien Patoux

CEA-Liten
CV

Title: Highlights on latest battery technology achievements & challenges

Abstract: After introducing our battery facilities and research activities, the presentation will focus on high energy density solutions. We will discuss how to push the limits of Li-ion batteries, and will detail the technologies offered to go further, including Li/Sulfur technology. We will continue our journey throught the batteries by considering the solutions to improve safety.


Iuliana Radu

Iuliana Radu

IMEC
CV

Title: From Advanced CMOS to Beyond CMO

Abstract: The information infrastructure is growing and becoming ubiquitous around us. Continuous connectivity, which we take for granted now, did not exist 10 years ago. This growth has been largely fueled by the scaling of the transistors which has allowed increased performance for comparable energy consumption and lower cost. Continuing growth further will demand a variety of electronic systems with different performance and energy efficiency requirements to satisfy a large set of functionality and cost needs.
Early on, the scaling of the transistors was driven by the lithographic improvements. More recently, the scaling is that of the performance and relies on new materials (high K dielectrics and metal gates) and on devices structure innovations (fully-depleted channel devices). The performance scaling of the next decade will likely bring concerted changes not only at the transistor level but also at the interconnect and at the architecture level as the 3rd dimension will be conquered.
The pace of innovation will like continue further as it is driven by technological needs. The scaling of the transistor will be influenced by fundamental physical limits of device switching. As these fundamental limits are reached revolutionary devices that do not rely on simple charge states will likely be used. Devices which employ spin, exciton or plasmon states as the information carrier and state variable have already been proposed and are being actively investigated as replacements for the CMOS transistors.
At imec, we are a investigating not only advanced CMOS devices and "end of the roadmap" transistors, but also Beyond CMOS devices which rely on new materials like graphene and 2D semiconductors and devices that employ a different state variable. This talk will outline these activities.


Mihail Roco

Mihail C. Roco

Senior Advisor for Nanotechnology National Science Foundation and National Nanotechnology Initiative
CV

Title: Update on Nanotechnology in the United States

Abstract: The long-term vision of the National Nanotechnology Initiative has been formulated in 1999-2000, is revisited periodically (www.wtec.org/nano2/), and implemented each year through the annual Supplements to the President's Budget (see www.nano.gov/node/1326). The fiscal year 2016 President's request is for $1.5 billion. Approximately two-thirds of NNI funding supports academic research and one-third supports R&D at government laboratories and industry. Additionally, about 6 percent over the $1.7 billion budget is estimated for the Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer programs. Revenues from products incorporating nanotechnology have already reached $1 trillion worldwide and about $318 billion in the United States alone, according to industry surveys (Lux Research). There is a dedicated focus on nanoscale science and engineering integration with other knowledge and technology domains and their applications (www.wtec.org/NBIC2-Report/). The presentation will briefly discuss the current research, education and innovation programs (such as Scalable Nanomanufacturing, National Nanotechnology Coordinated Infrastructure, Nanomodular materials and systems by design, connected nanocomponets and nanosensors in the Internet of Things, Innovation Corps), as well a longitudinal analysis of the effects funding on USPTO patents and WoS publications.


Masashi Sahashi

Masashi Sahashi

Program Manager, CSTI ImPACT Program and Research Professor, Tohoku University
CSTI ImPACT Program Manager; Japan Science and Technology Agency
CV

Title: ImPACT1: Ultimate Green IT Devices with long usage times between charges

Abstract: Today's mobile-IT devices require frequent charging and large number of battery chargers are plugged in for a long time at home and at office, while a battery charger itself wastes electric power. In addition, we are also stressed by the risk of the access interruption of emergency information during a large-scale disaster or prolonged power outage. Marked reduction of the power consumption of IT devices by using magnetic memories controlled by voltage and nonvolatile spin transistors enables a comfortable lifestyle without recharging anxiety. Moreover a safe and secure IT society is realized through the distributed spintronics IT system driven by harvested energy, where the information is accessible during large-scale disasters and prolonged power cut-off. Today's mainstream large-capacity memory DRAMs and even the non-volatile memory MRAMs under development require a large current to write information, which limits the energy efficiency. The Voltage Torque MRAM which should be developed in this program, a new type of high-speed and energy-efficient memory that can write information with voltage and can store information for a prolong period of time. The ultimate green IT devices can be achieved with zero standby power and ultra low active power consumption of a hundredth of present memory.


Takayasu Sakurai

Takayasu Sakurai

Professor
Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Japan CV

Title: CREST: From Nano-Electronics to Systems

Abstract: CREST research program started in 2013 entitled "Innovative nano-electronics through interdisciplinary collaboration among material, device and system layers" is introduced with a concept behind it. The program is aiming at achieving either low power or new functions. A special emphasis is put on the collaboration among different layers, which will open up a new continent of future electronics after CMOS scaling. Demonstration at the end of each project is also considered as a salient feature of the program.


Nobuyuki Sano

Nobuyuki Sano

Professor
Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba
CV

Title: A New Departure in Graduate Honors Program at University of Tsukuba

Abstract: Graduate Honors Program for Nanotechnology/Nanoscience (briefly, Honors Program) funded by MEXT has been initiated in 2010 as a special educational program for Ph.D. students in the Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences at University of Tsukuba. The purpose of the program is to create next-generation leaders in "nanotechnology". Prospective students should choose to major one of the five nano-tech research fields, namely, 1) silicon nano-electronics, 2) opto-electronics, 3) carbon nano-electonics, 4) spintronics, 5) nano-bio/organic electronics. Honors Program is differentiated from the traditional graduate programs at most Japanese universities in various aspects. The most distinguished feature is that, besides the ordinary academic supervisor, the "collaboration coordinator," who is among distinguished researcher with ample experiences at both academia and industry, is assigned to each student and the coordinator creates the "resonance field" by assigning research advisors from different research institutes, mainly from Tsukuba Science City area under the strong collaboration with TIA-nano (Tsukuba Innovation Arena for Nanotechnology). Students are, thus, expected to have a wide range of visions and, in many cases, practical goal of their research, not limited by supervisor's specialty. Another feature is that students are required to take academic courses at either Stanford Univ., MINATEC, SUNY Albany, or Leuven University at IMEC for one semester (quarter). This provides a unique opportunity for students to experience the world-standard of graduate courses at established universities as well as to construct human network with their research advisor and classmates. In addition, the students being selected as "Super-Research Assistants" could receive a stipend which covers the tuition and living expenses.


Junichi Sone

Junichi Sone

Principal Fellow
Center for Research and Development Strategy, Japan Science and Technology Agency
CV

Ryoichi Suzuki

Ryoichi Suzuki

Prime Senior Researcher,
Research Institute for Measurement and Analytical Instrumentation, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST)
CV

Title: Characterization of Nano Materials by a Positron Probe Micro Analyzer

Abstract: Characterization of atomic-scale and/or nano-scale structures in thin films or near surface regions is extremely important in the research and development of advanced nano materials because various properties are influenced by near surface structures. Slow positron beams are suitable for the study of those structures because we can control the implantation depth of positrons and can obtain atomic-scale and/or nano-scale open volume type structures. At the AIST electron LINAC facility, we have developed intense slow positron beamline, which can generate a positron micro beam, and also developed several advanced positron measurement techniques for characterization. We have applied those techniques to the characterization of various functional materials---polymer films, metal surfaces, semiconductor films, low-k dielectrics, hybrid materials, etc. In this presentation, we discuss resent advances in the measuement techniques using intense slow positrons, and characterization results on several functional materials.


Shinichi Takagi

Shinichi Takagi

Professor
Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, The University of Tokyo
CV

Title: Nano Device Technologies for Ultra Low Power LSIs

Abstract: CMOS utilizing high mobility Ge/III-V channels on Si substrates is expected to be one of the promising devices for high performance and low power advanced LSIs in the future, because of the enhanced carrier transport properties. In addition, Tunneling-FET (TFET) using Ge/III-V materials are regarded as one of the most important steep slope devices for the ultra-low power applications. Thus, the development of the device/process/integration technologies of Ge/III-V MOSFETs and TFETs on the Si platform for satisfying those device requirements is of the paramount importance.
In this paper, we address channel, source/drain (S/D) and gate stack engineering for realizing these devices with emphasis on thin EOT and ultrathin body structures, which are mandatory in the future technology nodes. The key technologies based on the engineering to enhance the performance of Ge/III-V MOSFETs are introduced. GeOx IL formation by ECR plasma post oxidation through ultrahin high-k films and atomic D annealing have realized high electron and hole mobility Ge MOSFETs with EOT less than 1 nm. Also, direct wafer bonding technologies enabling to realize ultrathin III-V-On-Insulator structures on large size Si substrates have been developed. InGaAs/InAs/InGaAs-OI ultrathin body quantum-well channel MOSFETs combined with Tri-gate structures have realized the operation of high performance MOSFET with channel lengths of sub-20 nm.
In addition, the effectiveness of Ge/III-V materials on TFETs through the enhancement of tunneling probability has been demonstrated. Tensile strain in Si channels combined with the Ge source can enhance the tunneling current because of the reduced effective bandgap. The fabricated Ge/strained-SOI TFETs show high Ion/Ioff ratio and steep minimum subthreshold slope (SS) of 28 mV/dec. Solid-phase Zn diffusion has been foupnd to provide steep-profile and defect-less p+/n source junctions in InGaAs. By employing this technology, the operation of high Ion/Ioff and low SS planar-type InGaAs TFETs have been demonstrated.


Kiyoshi Takagi

Kiyoshi Takagi

General Manager
Advanced Materials Laboratory, Nissan Motor Co., Ltd.
CV

Title: Advanced Technology and Future Mobility - Intelligent and Electrified Vehicles -

Abstract: Automotive industry innovates the mobility and reduces four major negative impacts; Environment, Energy, Traffic Accident, and Congestion, to contribute the society.
The key factors of innovation are "Electrification" and "Intelligence", these introduce state of the art of "Autonomous Driving Vehicle". Nissan has most influential history in EV technologies with more than 160,000 LEAFs in customers hand. Intelligent technologies are also well applied in latest models like "Safety Shield" which offer 360 degree protection, and these are basis of "Autonomous Driving".
Sensing, cognition, decision and action are the key functions associated with artificial intelligence, which need many of development works understanding complicated surroundings like pedestrians and cars nearby for the era of autonomous drive.
Four of the major negative impacts are now being overcome with the technologies. Moreover life of people is at the point of change improving convenience of mobility dramatically. Upcoming technologies and our goal are discussed in the session, stepping towards "Zero Emission" and "Zero Fatality".


Nobuhiko Tanaka

Nobuhiko Tanaka

Senior Director, Research and Development Division, Industrial Science and Technology Policy and Enviroment Bureau,
Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI)
CV

Title: Nanotechnology strategy for the Industry

Abstract: As for the industrial innovation system in Japan, it is important to promote "open innovation" and to reinforce "bridging functions" to overcome the "valley of death" between outstanding technological seeds and their commercialization. Recentry, Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) has reinvigorated "radical innovation" in the policy priorities. Now METI has formed the measures for these three policy targets; "open innovation", "bridging the death valley" and "radical innovation".
In this conference, the nanotechnology strategy for the industry will be highlighted through the presentation of the METI's relevant policies and measures.


Ken Uchida

Ken Uchida

Professor
Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Keio University/JST CREST
CV

Title: Thermal-aware Device Design of Nanoscale Electronic Devices for More Moore and More-than-Moore Applications

Abstract: In order to suppress the short-channel effects (SCE) in aggressively scaled MOS transistors, three-dimensional transistor structure such as fin-type FETs (FinFETs) is now becoming a main-stream technology. In FinFETs fabricated on bulk Si substrate, sub-10-nm silicon slab is utilized as a channel layer to realize better controllability of channel potential by the gate voltage. However, because of worse thermal conductivity of silicon nano-structures, heat generated by Joule-hearing during transistor operation tends to stay around the channel and raises the channel temperatures. The increased channel temperature degrades electron/hole mobility. Since carrier mobility is important for both analog and logic applications of transistors, the understanding of thermal properties of advanced MOS transistors is critically important. In this paper, experimental data on the evaluation of thermal properties of advanced MOS transistors in operation will be shown. Strategies to enhance transistor performance by thermal-aware device design will be discussed. Moreover, high temperatures observed in nanoscale electronic devices can be utilized to enhance the functionality of electronic devices. As an example of high functionalities, low-energy gas sensor and graphene ReRAM which could be implemented in LSI interconnects will be discussed.
In nanoscale electronic devices, the understanding of thermal properties is important not only to achieve high performance and/or low power consumption but also to realize new-type of devices where high temperature by Joule-heating in nanoscale structure is utilized. The collaboration between specialists on nano thermal properties and device engineers will be critically important.


Sukekatsu Ushioda

Sukekatsu Ushioda

NIMS

Title:


Eli Yablonovitch

Eli Yablonovitch

Professor
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Dept., University of California, Berkeley
CV

Title: The Challenge of a New Low-Voltage Switch That is Much More Sensitive Than the Transistor

Abstract: For the past 4 years, the NSF Center for Energy Efficient Electronics has been searching for a digital switching element that would operate at a much lower voltage than the conventional transistor. Transistors are thermally activated, and require a voltage >>kT/q for an acceptable On/Off ratio. We seek a more sensitive switching element that could operate at milli-Volts, thus reducing energy per bit-function by orders of magnitude.
The Center is pursuing a multi-faceted approach to these problems, which includes research toward a new more sensitive semiconductor switch, nano-mechanical switching, magnetic switching, and new more sensitive photo-receivers. While progress has occurred in all these directions, some avenues now appear more challenging than expected, while others continue to show promise. We will review the prospects.


Adrian Zlocki

Adrian Zlocki

Senior Manager
ADAS Department, Forschungsgesellschaft Kraftfahrwesen mbH Aachen (fka)
CV

Title: Challenges and Concepts towards Automated Driving

Abstract: Automated driving is currently under research in various projects and research activities. In order to support these activities a structured approach of different research areas, which are relevant for automated driving, is given. These are clustered into societal and legal aspects, human factors and the necessary technology which may result in technical standards. Furthermore, topics with regard to the driver, the vehicle and the environment are in the focus of these research areas. Moreover, the interaction within the control loop driver - vehicle - environment is presented for all different levels of automation. Based on such a comprehensive overview a concept for the technical development of automated driving is proposed in form of the so-called Alpha-Model. This model represents all necessary technical functions according to skill-based, rule-based or knowledge-based behaviour in analogy to the human cognition in a new architecture for automotive intelligence. Finally, a concept for the effective evaluation of automated driving is proposed in from of a data base of relevant driving situations, which are collected and simulated based on accident data, field operational and dedicated field test data. Such relevant driving situations are the basis for an effective evaluation methodology to be applied in simulation, driving simulators and in the controlled field. Evaluation requirements, methods and tools are provided as a result of the European research project AdaptIVe - Automated Driving Applications and Technologies for Intelligent Vehicles


Michael Zentner, Gerhard Klimeck

Michael Zentner, Gerhard Klimeck

Michael Zentner
Senior Research Scientist, Network for Computational Nanotechnology, the Rosen Center for Advanced Computing (RCAC), Purdue University

Gerhard Klimeck
Director of the Network for Computational Nanotechnology Reilly Director of the Center for Predictive Materials and Devices Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University

CV

Title: nanoHUB: the Growth of a United States Cyberinfrastructure into a Global Learning and Research Community

Abstract: Since the first introduction in 1997 of what today is called nanoHUB, the user base of nanoHUB has grown both in size and geographic distribution. Today, people access nanoHUB resources and run simulations on nanoHUB from almost everywhere on the globe where the night sky is lit. nanoHUB has also grown in scope, having started initially as a source of computational resources and grown today into much more than that by offering data repository services, data exploration tools, publishing workflows, project collaboration areas, and a wide array of informational videos, downloadable resources, and even MOOCs through nanoHUB-U. We will discuss the overall international usership of nanoHUB, and also describe the specific types of activities occurring in the international community on nanoHUB, both from anecdotal and highly data driven perspectives. We will also discuss how we measure the quality of activities occurring on nanoHUB. Finally, we conclude with an open invitation for international collaboration with the nanoHUB team from both content and user perspectives.